Posts for: February, 2017

By Advanced Dental Cosmetics
February 27, 2017
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: porcelain veneers  
AvoidPermanentToothAlterationwithNo-PrepVeneers

Porcelain veneers have become a popular way to transform a smile. They're ideal for stained, chipped or slightly misaligned teeth. But although they don't need as much tooth preparation as crowns or other bridgework, the traditional veneer still requires some permanent tooth alteration.

Now, there's an alternative: no-prep veneers. With this option we can avoid any tooth structure removal or keep it to a minimum. And it may not even require local anesthesia while applying them.

Veneers are as their name implies: a wafer-thin layer of tooth-colored porcelain that's bonded to the outside of a tooth, much like siding on a house. Although the traditional veneer is usually no more than a millimeter in width, they can still add an unnatural bulky look and feel to a tooth. To compensate, we remove portions of the enamel. A tooth permanently altered this way will henceforth require some form of restoration.

No-prep veneers are much thinner; they also don't extend under the gum line like traditional veneers. At the most the new veneers may only require us to perform some minor reshaping of the enamel, but not to the extent of traditional veneers. And because your tooth isn't permanently altered, we could presumably remove the veneer and return the tooth to its natural state and appearance (although removing the bonding might not be that easy).

There are some situations where some tooth alteration may still be necessary, like oversized or forward-jutting teeth. A bad bite (malocclusion) may require orthodontic treatment first — which in some cases could be an alternative treatment to veneers altogether.

To find out if you're a candidate for no-prep veneers, visit us for a complete examination. From there we can discuss your options and whether we can transform your smile with little change to your teeth.

If you would like more information on cosmetic solutions like porcelain veneers, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.


By Advanced Dental Cosmetics
February 26, 2017
Category: Dental Procedures
JohnnysTeethArentRottenAnyMore

Everyone has to face the music at some time — even John Lydon, former lead singer of The Sex Pistols, arguably England’s best known punk rock band. The 59-year old musician was once better known by his stage name, Johnny Rotten — a brash reference to the visibly degraded state of his teeth. But in the decades since his band broke up, Lydon’s lifelong deficiency in dental hygiene had begun to cause him serious problems.

In recent years, Lydon has had several dental surgeries — including one to resolve two serious abscesses in his mouth, which left him with stitches in his gums and a temporary speech impediment. Photos show that he also had missing teeth, which, sources say, he opted to replace with dental implants.

For Lydon (and many others in the same situation) that’s likely to be an excellent choice. Dental implants are the gold standard for tooth replacement today, for some very good reasons. The most natural-looking of all tooth replacements, implants also have a higher success rate than any other method: over 95 percent. They can be used to replace one tooth, several teeth, or an entire arch (top or bottom row) of teeth. And with only routine care, they can last for the rest of your life.

Like natural teeth, dental implants get support from the bone in your jaw. The implant itself — a screw-like titanium post — is inserted into the jaw in a minor surgical operation. The lifelike, visible part of the tooth — the crown — is attached to the implant by a sturdy connector called an abutment. In time, the titanium metal of the implant actually becomes fused with the living bone tissue. This not only provides a solid anchorage for the prosthetic, but it also prevents bone loss at the site of the missing tooth — which is something neither bridgework nor dentures can do.

It’s true that implants may have a higher initial cost than other tooth replacement methods; in the long run, however, they may prove more economical. Over time, the cost of repeated dental treatments and periodic replacement of shorter-lived tooth restorations (not to mention lost time and discomfort) can easily exceed the expense of implants.

That’s a lesson John Lydon has learned. “A lot of ill health came from neglecting my teeth,” he told a newspaper reporter. “I felt sick all the time, and I decided to do something about it… I’ve had all kinds of abscesses, jaw surgery. It costs money and is very painful. So Johnny says: ‘Get your brush!’”

We couldn’t agree more. But if brushing isn’t enough, it may be time to consider dental implants. If you would like more information about dental implants, please call our office to schedule a consultation. You can read more in the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Dental Implants” and “Save a Tooth or Get an Implant?


By Advanced Dental Cosmetics
February 18, 2017
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: tmj disorders  
KnowtheFactsBeforeConsideringBotoxforJawJointPain

If you have chronic jaw joint pain you may have heard of using Botox to relieve discomfort from temporomandibular disorders (TMD). Before you seek out this remedy, though, be sure you know the facts beforehand.

TMD is actually a group of conditions affecting the joints, muscles and overall structures of the jaw. People with TMD often experience sharp pain and reduced range of motion of the jaw joints. Although we don't know the exact causes, we believe stress (accompanied often by teeth grinding habits) is a major factor for many patients.

Treatments run the spectrum from conservative to aggressive. Conservative treatments include cold and heat packs, therapeutic exercises, and muscle pain or relaxant medication. On the more aggressive side, patients undergo surgery to reorient the lower jaw. Most people gain a significant amount of relief from conservative therapies; the results aren't as positive with surgery.

Botox falls on the aggressive side of treatments. Approved for use by the Food and Drug Administration for cosmetic uses, the drug contains botulinum toxin type A, a bacterial toxin that can cause muscle paralysis. It's often injected into facial structures to paralyze small muscles and temporarily “smooth out” wrinkle lines. Only recently has it been proposed to help relieve jaw pain.

The jury, however, is still out on its effectiveness with jaw pain. The double-blind testing performed thus far hasn't produced any relevant clinical results that the injections actually work with TMD.

And there are other complications. Some people injected with Botox encounter pain, bruising or swelling at the injection site, and some have severe headaches afterward. Botox is also a temporary solution, not a permanent cure — you'll need another injection a few months later to maintain the effect. You might even develop antibodies that diminish the drug's effect and require higher subsequent doses to compensate.

This and other concerns should give you pause before seeking out this remedy. The best strategy is to try the traditional treatments first, which are also the least invasive. If there's no significant relief, then talk to us and your physician about other options.

If you would like more information on treatment options for TMD, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Botox Treatment for TMJ Pain.”


By Advanced Dental Cosmetics
February 10, 2017
Category: Oral Health
Tags: gum recession  
DontWait-SeekOutTreatmentforGumRecessionNow

If you've suddenly noticed your smile looking more “toothy,” you may have a problem with your gums. They may have lost their normal attachment to your tooth and begun to shrink back — or recede.

Millions of people have some form of gum recession. The most common cause is periodontal (gum) disease, but it's not the only one. You may be more susceptible to gum recession because of heredity — you have thin gum tissues passed down to you from your parents. You may also be brushing too hard and too often and have damaged your gums.

Healthy gums play an important role in dental health. The crown, the tooth's visible part, is covered with a hard, protective shell called enamel. As the enamel ends near where the root begins, the gums take over, forming a tight band around the tooth to protect the roots from bacteria and acid.

Receding gums expose these areas of the tooth meant to be covered. This can lead to another tell-tale sign — tooth sensitivity. You begin to notice pain and discomfort while you consume hot or cold foods. And because it leaves your teeth and gums looking much less attractive, it can affect your confidence to smile.

Fortunately, though, we can help restore receded gums. If you have gum disease, it's imperative we treat it as early as possible. We do this by removing plaque, a thin film of bacteria and food particles that triggers the infection. We use special techniques and hand instruments to remove plaque and calculus (hardened plaque deposits) from all tooth surfaces including along the roots.

Gum disease treatment can help stop and even reverse gum recession. In some cases, though, the recession may have advanced too far. If so, we may need to consider surgically grafting donor tissue to the recessed areas. Depending on the site and extent of recession, this can be a very involved procedure requiring microscopic techniques.

The best approach, though, is to take care of your gums now. Daily brushing and flossing removes harmful plaque; regular dental visits take cleaning a step further and also give us an opportunity to detect disease early. By looking out for your gums now you might be able to avoid gum recession in the future.

If you would like more information on diagnosing and treating gum recession, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.


By Advanced Dental Cosmetics
February 02, 2017
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: crowns  
NewCrownsGiveBothDurabilityandBeautytoProblemTeeth

Repairing a decayed tooth may be as simple as removing the damaged tooth material and filling the void. Many filling materials can now match the color of a tooth, so the dental work is hardly noticeable.

Sometimes, though, the decay is too extensive or we've treated the tooth several times and it won't support another filling. If the tooth is still viable, we may be able to cover it with a custom crown.

Also known as a cap, a crown fits over and is securely affixed to the tooth with bonding material or cement. Crowns have been used for decades to restore teeth, but the materials they're made of have changed with time.

The original crowns were made of metal, usually gold or silver. They were strong and could hold up well to the daily forces produced by chewing or biting. They did, however, visually stand out and came to be regarded as unattractive. There were porcelain materials available that could closely mimic the life-likeness of teeth, but they could be weak and brittle.

Dentists came up with a hybrid crown that could supply strength as well as an attractive appearance. These were composed of two parts: an inner metal frame for strength overlaid with porcelain for appearance. These fused crowns were the most popular until the mid-2000s.

About that time, newer forms of porcelain came on the market that were not only attractive, but also durable. Although caution should still be taken when biting something hard, they've proven to stand up well to biting forces. Fused porcelain to metal is still in use, but usually for back teeth where biting forces are higher and the crown won't be as noticeable as on front teeth.

Crowns can also address cosmetic issues with chipped, fractured or excessively worn teeth. But with any crown you should be aware that much of the original tooth material must be removed to accommodate the fit. The altered tooth will require a crown or other restoration from then on. Crowns must also be custom-made by a dental technician in a process that can take weeks.

Still, the process can be well worth it. With proper care and maintenance, a crown could serve you and your smile well for many years to come.

If you would like more information on crowns and other restoration options, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Crowns & Bridgework.”




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